European Forum

New turmoil in Egypt in the run-up to elections

Tue 17 Apr 2012 New turmoil in Egypt in the run-up to elections

On Saturday the 14th of April, ten presidential candidates were barred from the elections in Egypt of which the first round is to be held on May the 23rd. Three of them - Khairat al-Shater of the Muslim Brotherhood, Omar Suleiman, the former intelligence chief and Hazem Abu Ismail, the ultra-conservative Salafi candidate -  have now decided to appeal this decision of the election commission. On Tuesday the commission will decide which of these appeals will be reviewed.

However, the argumentation for exclusion is based on legal grounds, which are difficult to challenge. Furthermore, Heba Morayef, an Egypt researcher for Human Rights Watch stated that “this is good news for human rights” and the Egyptian people, considering the former position of Suleiman within the deposed regime of Mubarak.

The nomination of Khairat al-Shater as presidential candidate for the Muslim Brotherhood, already encountered resistance earlier. The Muslim Brotherhood has been opposing themselves to a great deal of other parties and organisations. Nevertheless, they still have a chance of winning the elections with backup candidate Mohammed Mursi. Since Al-Shater was released from jail following an amnesty only March last year, his candidacy is allegedly conflicting with the rule that candidates can only run in elections six years after being released or pardoned.

The candidacy of Suleiman, who was Mubarak's feared head of intelligence for two decades, was not less controversial. He was barred  because of a problem with collecting voter endorsements in a legally required minimum of 15 provinces.

Abu Ismail, a lawyer-turned-preacher, was reportedly disqualified from running because his late mother allegedly held dual American-Egyptian citizenship. As he is the only Salafist qualified for competing during the elections, his disqualification is problematic for this part of the Egyptian population.

On April 26th, a definite list with the candidates will be presented by the election commission. Now, only 13 of the initial 23 candidates remain in the running up for presidency.


Sources:
- The Washington Post
- Al Jazeera
- Guide to Egypt’s transition

Image
Flickr by Ahmed Abd El-Fatah


Back to news

Syrian Arab RepublicSyrian Arab Republic

Thu 23 Apr 2015 Since mid-March, massive protests and demonstrations have broke out in Syria. Read the country update for the latest developments. Read full update

ArmeniaArmenia

Mon 13 Apr 2015 In contrast to the presidential elections in 2008, which were followed by violent protests and clashes between the opposition and the law enforcement that left 10 people dead, the presidential elections of 2013 were peaceful and calm in nature. With the main perceived opposition challengers not participated, they were marked by a general apathy and a relatively easy victory for incumbent... Read full update

UkraineUkraine

Wed 25 Mar 2015 Ukraine has a parliamentary presidential system, which means that the country elects on national level a head of state, the president, and a legislature. The president is elected for a five-year term directly by the people. The president needs a majority of the votes in the first round to be elected. Otherwise a second round is held, in which only the two candidates with the highest amount of... Read full update

Stay informed. Get the newsflash.

Join our news service. European Forum for Solidarity and Democracy provides news and updates about Central, Eastern and South Eastern Europe.
close X

Send this page to a contact


E-mail address recipient

Your e-mail address

Your name

Message